REBLOGGED: Writing a Scene

I need to have a look at this…..

Writing Tip Tuesday #28: Jordan Rosenfeld & Martha Alderson

by Evolet

writing_tips

In all my pantsing-ness, I could care less about structure, plot points, pinch points, the midpoint and what makes up a scene.

I just want to see where the writing takes me and while I’m doing that, I’m praying to the Writing Goddesses that I don’t hit a wall. But really, it’s nice to know where one should stand when it comes to writing scenes and [tag]Jordan Rosenfeld [/tag]and [tag]Martha Alderson[/tag] provide a break down on the Fundamentals of Writing a Scene.

What comprises a scene?

If you’ve never thought much about the shape of a scene, consider it a self-contained mini-story with a rising energy that builds to an epiphany, a discovery, an admission, an understanding, or an experience. The reader should feel as though every scene has purpose, deepens character, drives the story forward, and ends in such a way that he just has to know what happens next.

What’s the best way to start and end a scene?

You need not start scenes with an explanation or exposition but simply with an entrance into the action. Then, by following a character’s goals and desires, you walk your reader through a setting—preferably in a way that shows the protagonist interacting with it, not just observing it—employing the character’s sensory perceptions, introducing his conflict and relationship with inner and outer antagonists and allies, and building the character to a high or low point. Never leave the reader too satisfied at the end of a scene; she must want to keep reading to find out what happens next.

What should a scene accomplish?

Each scene creates consequences that must be dealt with or built upon in the next scene.

A scene is defined by the presence of more real-time momentum than interior monologue (contemplation) or expository explanation.

Real-time momentum is a combination of action, dialogue, and character interaction with his surroundings and other characters. Your scenes can end on a high note (a small victory for your character) or a low note (a moment of cliff-hanging suspense or uncertainty). It doesn’t matter which way it goes so long as each scene concludes by setting up future conflicts for the character(s) and creating in readers a yearning to know what happens next.

What qualifies as a scene?

If you’re wondering whether a passage or section you’ve written qualifies as a scene, consider what scenes are not.

  • Scenes are not an opportunity to take your character on a long, leisurely detour into situations with characters that have nothing to do with the protagonist’s dramatic action goals (that’s a character profile or vignette).
  • Scenes are not a place to explain something or to lecture to your reader (that’s a pace killer).
  • Scenes are not long histories of people and places (that’s dull backstory).
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